Throwback Thursday: Construction c.1970?

I ran into this photo while digging in a coupe of boxes looking for potential Throwback photos.

I’m guessing this was taken around 1970.

Is that high-rise the Contessa condominium, near where the end of King Street hits Kapiolani?

Or perhaps one of those condos near Kapiolani and Date?

And what vantage point is the photo taken from?

But I’m sure I took the photo, and the 1970 time frame seems about right.

What’s your guess on the location and time frame?

By the way, just click on the photo to see a larger version.

Construction

Candidate disclosures offer rare glimpse at finances

Here’s a pot of data that often gets overlooked.

I’m talking about the financial disclosures filed by candidates for state offices, including House, Senate, and Office of Hawaiian Affairs.

These aren’t as useful for those incumbents running for reelection, since their regular annual disclosures include more information.

However, the candidate disclosures are very useful for learning more about the challengers, a list which usually includes at least a few people of interest because of their roles in community groups, business, or public affairs.

In many cases, the candidate disclosure provide the only public accounting of their financial interests and business ties.

Okay, that may sound a lot like snooping. But to a reporter, or a citizen activist, information can be powerful, whether immediately or sometime in the future.

The disclosure process is administered by the State Ethics Commission, which recently published a list of candidates who have filed this year. It’s a good place to start.

Browse the list, and if you see a name of interest to you, then check the candidate disclosure database, click on the link for the person’s form, and check it out. You can save the form as a pdf for future reference.

HBO movie goes “All the way”

Political junkies take note.

If you subscribe to HBO in any form, or can beg or borrow access from a friend, be sure to watch the HBO movie, “All the way.”

It’s a movie adaptation of Seattle playwright Robert Schenkkan’s stage play which follows Lyndon Baines Johnson through the intense period from the beginning of his presidency in November 1963 through the 1964 election, where “All the way with LBJ” was the Democratic candidate’s campaign theme.

Count me on the side of critics who called Bryan Cranston’s depiction of LBJ “mesmerizing.”

We stumbled on the movie by accident a few nights ago while looking for something to watch, and were unaware of all the press attention it received following its debut earlier this year.

If you lived through those years back in the 1960s, it’s powerful and disturbing. If you’re way too young for that, it’s a pretty close-to-real-life look behind the scenes of hardball politics.

“Politics is war by other means,” LBJ muses at one point. Then he quickly circles back. “Politics is war.” Period.

I’ve read several of the books about LBJ, including a couple of valumes of Robert Caro’s intimate portrait of the man and his career, and collections of the secret White House tapes compiled by historian Michael Beschloss. I thought “All the way” captured much of what’s there in the historical record, and made it very human.

Johnson was being hit by competing political forces on all sides, the growing civil rights movement, the overt racism of the formerly solid Democratic South, a conservative challenge by GOP candidate Barry Goldwater, a deteriorating political and situation in Southeast Asia. We watch as he alternatively cajoles, bluffs, arm twists, horse trades, and outright bullies those who stand in his way, resorting to temper tantrums where necessary.

And there were great performances by those playing the other characters, from FBI director J. Edgar Hoover to Minnesota’s Hubert Humphrey and Georgia’s Richard Russell.

Good entertainment and engrossing history at the same time.

Monday miscellany

I decided to start the week by checking out a few blogs that I haven’t visited for a while. Oooh, there’s lots of good stuff out there waiting to be seen.

Horsesass.org is based in Washington State and has a caustic view of the state’s politics and, by extension, the national scene.

Check out its Friday Night Multimedia Extravaganza!, featuring links to a wide variety of items.

Buried down the list is this one: Democratic National Convention–A bad lip reading. Lots of fun here!

I then wandered over to Seattle-based Crosscut.com, which bills itself as “news of the great nearby.”

Several of the current stories sound very similar.

Examples:

Why huge cost overruns are so common in Seattle.”

Homeless in Seattle: The roots of a crisis.

As Seattle booms, we’re trashing our history.

Finally, I stopped by Crooks And Liars. Always interesting.

For example, here’s one featured story: “Memo To News Media: Consumers Crave Truth, Not Balance.”

Here’s an excerpt:

Our most popular clips and posts are not ones where we simply highlight and correct lies people tell on television. Those gain attention for sure, but they’re not the ones that people talk about, share, and appreciate.

Our most popular clips are the ones where the host or journalist takes on the lie head-on. Like when CNN’s Brianna Keilar refused to allow Trump surrogate and lawyer Michael Cohen bully her.

CNN reporter Kate Bolduan’s emotional report on the Syrian boy, Omran, whose family home was devastated by bombs was a moment of truth we all needed to see.

MSNBC’s Joy-Ann Reid had several moments this week. The video at the top where she told the Trump pastor he couldn’t come on her show and lie was a great one. Or when Trump surrogate Steve Cortes found out she doesn’t suffer fools lightly, as did Jack Kingston on Friday. Earlier last week, she also let Cortes have it for whining about “liberal media.”

Anyway, it’s a good way to start a week!

Thanks for sharing a graceful saga

A special shout-out to Jennifer and Ryan Ozawa, who are once again breaking new ground by sharing Jenn’s experience with a recurrence of breast cancer.

Four years ago, they created Jen’s Cancer Blog. It not only documented her fight with the disease, but gathered links to useful resources to assist others.

Earlier this month, after a long hiatus, a new post appeared.

“Season 2, Episode 1.”

The first time, cancer was scary because we had no idea what was coming. This time, it’s scary because we do.

Somehow, while coping with the cancer news, this amazing couple launched a daughter into a college career at UH Hilo, which Ryan somehow found time to write eloquently about in an essay posted to Medium.com.

Thanks to you both for sharing your story and your strength.

Cancer is becoming an all too familiar presence in our family these days as well, and your poise in facing the future is hopefully contagious.